Arkansas City Early Bird Lions Club
  • We Serve

  • We Serve

  • We Serve

  • We Serve

  • We Serve

 


Program Chairperson, Lion John Bohannon (right)
presenting a speakers gift.

A lost Kansas Lion crossed the Oklahoma state line but found a Pride of Lions to run with for the day.

While carnivoreing with the Ponca City Noon Lions, Early Bird Lion Tim Hays (left picture) had the privilege and honor of addressing their Pride, about the collection of eyeglasses and cell phones that are picked up in their community.

Several boxes of fifty-clean, indexed, and packaged prescription glasses ready for distribution were on display for the Noon Lions to view which represented finished eyeglasses for mission trips.

A film was shown during the enlightenment (sight related), about how the eyeglasses make it to third world countries, and how the vision correction changes their lives.

 

 

Early Birds Successfully Assemble Our New Popcorn Machine


Lion Dennis Goans was the Official Taste Tester.

Lion Ruben Garcia (center) and Lion Gustavo Matamoras (right) continue the assembly while Lion Dennis tries another bag.

The finishing touches.

 

A True Lion

Elden P. Hoffhines

1922 - 2010

The Charter of the Early Bird Lions Club was formally issued on November 13, 1981. The Official Charter Night Banquet was held on January 30, 1982.  Not only was Lion Elden a Guiding Lion for the new club, but then transferred his membership to the Early Bird Lions Club from the Evening Lions Club.  His legacy still lives and is one of the more viable Lions Clubs in Kansas.  He served as District Governor from 1974-75. Lion Elden also served as Kansas Lions State Council Chairman from 1975-76

 

This memorial was created by Lion Mary Schneider to celebrate Lion Elden.

 

The Lion Elden memorial will be displayed in this trophy case ocated inside the banquet room at Daisy Mae's cafe.

 

 

Welcome

Hello, and welcome to the Arkansas City Early Bird Lions Club's website.  If you are a member of this club then this is the place to keep up to date.  If you are a member of another club, then we hope you find this site informative and will visit our club some time.  If you are someone just interested in finding out about the Lions or contemplating joining a club, then this site will be a great first step in joining the largest service organization in the world.

 

Look through the pages on our site and you will see that we are constantly doing something to help anyone in need.  No matter what you do, what your skills are, or how much time you have to devote to community service, you will always be welcome to join us and become a Lion.

 



 

Club Meetings:

Every 2nd and 4th Friday at 6:30AM

Daisy Mae's Cafe

511 W. Madison

 

Board of Directors Meetings:

Wednesday following the first club meeting at 6:30AM

Daisy Mae's Cafe

511 W. Madison

Map

 

 

 

 

 

Projects


County Fair

Koats for Kids 
   

Dare Picnic
 
Habitat for Humanity
   
 
Festival of Trees
 
Candy Day
   
 
Health Fair
 
Lions Mobile Screening Unit
   

 

Jungle Cook-off

History

Early Bird Lions Club History

The Arkansas City Early Bird Lions Club is one of more than 45,000 Lions Clubs throughout the free world. Lions Clubs International, in it’s purpose and principal, has the one common goal that binds every member (1,440,000+) to our motto, “We Serve”. We are the largest in terms of membership, number of clubs, and service to our respective communities of all service club organizations. Our service to our communities includes from aid to the visually handicapped to offering financial assistance to those who need a helping hand. Lions are known generally as men and women who are big — not necessarily big in stature or big in the business world, but big-hearted people who stooped low to help a child in distress or stood tall to light the lamps for the blind. The idea of Lionism is one of service, as a group, to their fellowmen without regard to politics, religion, race or personal interest groups.

Membership into a Lions Club is open to men and women of legal majority and good reputation in the community, and is by invitation only.

The emblem of Lions Clubs International consists of a gold letter "L" on a circular purple field. Bordering this is a circular gold area with two lion profiles facing away from the center. The word "Lion" and "International" appear at the top and bottom. The Lions are meant to face both a proud past and confident future.

The motto of Lions Clubs International is "We Serve" and it precisely explains its mission.  

The first Kansas Lions Club was chartered in Wichita on December 4, 1919. The second was in Arkansas City. By January 1, 2003, there were approximately 9,000 Lions Club Members in Kansas. 

The Charter of the Early Bird Lions Club was formally issued on November 13, 1981. The Official Charter Night Banquet was held on January 30, 1982 with Ed Hargrove serving as Charter Night Chairman. Benjamin H. Swaim, Jr. was the Charter President, Forest E. Smith was Charter Secretary, and William A. Morris was Charter Treasurer. There were 26 Charter Members.

The Arkansas City Early Bird Lions Club is a member of Multiple District 17, which includes all of Kansas.

 The Hierarchy of this organization in order of rank are District Governor, who is elected annually by the District Delegates, who in turn appoints Junior Officers and Committees to assist and serve during the Fiscal Year July 1 to June 30. A Vice District Governor is also elected by the delegates and he/she will normally be elected as District Governor the following year.

Three Early Bird Lions have served as District Governor: Lion Tim Hays, 1993-94; Lion Kyle Tilson, 1985-86;  Lion Elden Hoffhines, 1974-75. Lion Elden Hoffhines served as Kansas Lions State Council Chairman, 1975-76. The Early Bird Lions Club is one of the newer Clubs in the District, but it is recognized as one of the “Better” Clubs in most all respects even though it is a relatively small club.

Our Club has 13 Melvin Jones Fellows.  This represents $13,000.00 given to Sight First or Lions Club International Foundation, which goes to humanitarian aid, wherever needed.

 

 

Lions Clubs International History

The International Association of Lions Clubs began as the dream of a Chicago insurance man Melvin Jones, who wondered why local business clubs -- he was an active member of one -- could not expand their horizons from purely business concerns to the betterment of their communities and the world at large.

Jones' idea struck a chord within his own group, the Business Circle of Chicago, and they authorized him to explore his concept with similar organizations from around the United States. His efforts resulted in an organizational meeting at a local hotel on June 7, 1917.

The 12 men who gathered there overcame a natural sense of loyalty to their parent clubs, voted the "Association of Lions Clubs" into existence, and issued a call for a national convention to be held in Dallas, Texas, USA in October of the same year.

Thirty-six delegates representing 22 clubs from nine states heeded the call, approved the "Lions Clubs" designation, and elected Dr. William P. Woods of Indiana as their first president. Guiding force and founder Melvin Jones was named acting secretary. Thus began an association with Lionism that only ended with his death in 1961.

That first convention also began to define what Lionism was to become. A constitution and by-laws were adopted, the colors of purple and gold approved, and a start made on Lionism's Objectives and Code of Ethics.

One of the objects was startling for an era that prided itself on mercenary individualism, and has remained one of the main tenets of Lionism ever since. "No Club," it read, "shall hold out the financial betterment of its members as its object."

Community leaders soon began to organize clubs throughout the United States, and the association became "international" with the formation of the Windsor, Ontario, Canada Lions Club in 1920. Clubs were later organized in China, Mexico, and Cuba. By 1927, membership stood at 60,000 in 1,183 clubs.

In 1935, Panama became home to the first Central American club, with the first South American club being organized in Colombia the following year. Lionism reached Australia in 1947 and Europe in 1948, as clubs were chartered in Sweden, Switzerland, and France. In 1952, the first club was chartered in Japan.

The International Association of Lions Clubs is today the largest service organization in the world with over 1.4 million members in more than 43,300 clubs in 714 Districts covering 182 countries and geographic areas. Lions Clubs are not social clubs, although there are social benefits to membership. Lions Club members give their time, skills and resources to raise funds for charitable giving both in their communities and internationally.

The major focus of Lions fund raising activities is sight conservation, although other projects are pursued such as drug awareness programs in high schools, diabetes awareness programs and other programs that are specific to individual Clubs and Districts. Lions took up sight conservation as their major goal after a speech given by Helen Keller at the Lions International Convention held at Cedar Point, Ohio, in 1925. At that time, Helen Keller challenged the Lions to become "Knights of the Blind", a challenge that has become a rallying cry for Lions projects around the world.

Lions work in the area of sight conservation is carried out at many levels. Individual Clubs sponsor free eye screening programs using mobile eye clinics. In many countries, Clubs sponsor eye surgery camps where cataract surgeries are performed at no charge for those that can't afford this medical care. Many clubs collect old eye glasses for distribution to the needy in other countries.

The International Association of Lions Clubs is the largest non-governmental organization associated with the United Nations and was called upon by the United Nations and the World Health Organization to raise funds for an international program of sight conservation. It has been estimated that 40 million cases of curable and preventable blindness exist on this planet today. Without intervention, this is projected to become 80 million by the end of the decade.

The International Association of Lions Clubs began a program of fund raising that they called "Campaign Sight First" in order to cure/prevent 40 million cases of blindness worldwide. Over $148,600,000 have been raised by Lions all over the world for this program. Eye hospitals are being built in the places that most need them. In India alone, over 300,000 cataract surgeries have been performed and that number is rapidly growing. Lions services to humanity range from purchasing eyeglass for a child who's parents can't afford them to multimillion dollar programs to cure blindness on a worldwide scale.

Videos

 

1925 Helen Keller speech reenactment.

 

 

The Reynolds Family

 

 

Lisa Johnson

 

 

The Burchett Family

 

 

Lions Links

Kansas Tax Exempt Lions Foundations

Kansas District 17 Websites

Other Lions Links

Kansas Lions Band Foundation

Kansas Lions Foundation

 

L

I

O

N

S

 

Lions Clubs International

Kansas Lions

LionNet

LCIF

LionWap

 Kansas Lions Mobile Screening Unit

Officers & Members

Officers

 

President: Jacqueline Snavely

jsnavely@amfam.com

 

1st Vice President: Rex Riggs

riggs@taxes.kscoxmail.com

 

2nd Vice President: Mike Pudden

 jPudden@cox.net

 

3rd Vice President: Sue Lancaster

sueanncaster@yahoo.com

 

2 Year Director:  Don Ward

dward23@cox.net

 

2 Year Director: Richard Schneider

rjs1936@cox.net

 

1 Year Director: Sara Ward

saraw5412@gmail.com

1 Year Director: Bob Mathews

Tail Twister: Mary Schneider

rjs1936@cox.net

 

IT Chairman: Scott Cranford

scranford@cox.net

 

Lion Tamer: Elrea Mullen

Elmullen245@yahoo.com

 

Secretary: Lynda Marshall

lyndaem48@gmail.com

 

Treasurer: Tim Hays

LionTimHays@cox.net

 

Membership Chairman: Sara Ward

saraw5412@gmail.com

 

Disaster Chairman: Mike Bergagnini

mikeberg3@cox.net

 

Sight Chairman: Bob Mathews

Past President: Ruben Garcia

rgarcia72@cox.net

Members

 

David Baxter

 

 

Jean Donaldson

emmajean_smith@att.net

 

Heidi Ensley

hEnsley@TMSeyecare.com

 

Disaster Chairman: Dennis Goans

ApplKlinik@sbcglobal.net

 

Gustavo Matamoras

lionmatamoros@hotmail.com 

 

Sylvia Riggs

sylviariggs@hotmail.com

 

Mary Schneider

rjs1936@cox.net

 

Scott Snavely

ScottPsnavely@yahoo.com

 

Kathy J. Sparks

ksparks16@cox.net

 

Richard Winter

rich.winter3285@gmail.com

 

Laurie Wycoff

laurie.wycoff@cox.net





Minutes

All minutes are preliminary until approved at the next meeting.

 

2014

Regular Meetings

8/22/14

8/8/14

7/25/14

7/11/14

6/27/14

6/21/14

6/13/14

5/23/14

5/9/14

4/25/14

4/11/14

3/28/14

3/14/14

2/28/14

2/14/14

1/24/14

1/10/14

Board Meetings

8/13/14

7/16/14

6/18/14

5/14/14

4/16/14

3/19/14

3/11/14

2/19/14

1/15/14

 

2013

Regular Meetings

12/27/13

12/13/13

11/22/13

11/8/13

10/25/13

9/27/13

9/13/13

8/23/13

8/9/13

7/26/13

7/12/13

6/28/13

6/14/13

5/24/13

4/26/13

4/12/13

3/22/13

3/8/13

2/22/13

2/13/13

2/8/13

1/25/13

1/11/13

Board Meetings

12/18/13

11/13/13

10/16/13

9/18/13

8/14/13

7/17/13

6/19/13

6/3/13

5/15/13

4/14/13

3/13/13

2/13/13

1/16/13

 



2012

Regular Meetings

12/28/12

12/14/12

10/26/12

10/12/12

9/28/12

9/14/12

8/24/12

8/10/12

7/27/12

7/13/12

6/22/12

6/8/12

5/25/12

5/11/12

4/27/12

4/13/12

3/23/12

3/9/12

2/24/12

2/10/12

1/27/12

1/13/12

Board Meetings

11/16/12

11/14/12

10/26/12

10/17/12

9/15/12

8/15/12

7/28/12 Vote

7/18/12

6/13/12

5/16/12

4/18/12

3/20/12

2/15/12

1/27/12

1/18/12

 

 



2011

 

 



Donate Used Glasses


Left to Right: Eyeglass Drop Off Box - Lion Tim Hays, PDG.

Contact

Used Eyeglass Dropoff Locations:

 

Hays Sign Co.

110 W. Adams

620-442-1790

TMS Eye Care

2508 Edgemont Dr.

620-442-2577

 

 

An Example of Someone Willing to Give - 1958

 

The Journey of Recycled Eyeglasses

Posted by Lions Clubs International on Tuesday, May 14, 2013

Lions Clubs International eyeglass recycling

 

Eyeglass recycling is one of the most well-known sight services that Lions clubs organize worldwide in the fight against blindness. But what happens to the eyeglasses once they are collected?

  1. Lions place eyeglass collection boxes at various locations around their community, including libraries, optometrists’ offices, schools and banks.

  2. Lions ship the eyeglasses to the nearest Eyeglass Recycling Center. Trained volunteers then sort, clean and determine prescription strengths of the glasses.

  3. Lions package the prepared eyeglasses and store them until they are needed for eyeglass-dispensing missions, which often take place in developing nations for people who do not have access to the proper eye care.

  4. Eye care professionals work with trained Lion volunteers at the mission sites to perform vision screenings. They provide the appropriate recycled eyeglasses, free of charge, to children and adults in need.

 

May is Recycle for Sight Month! How long has your Lions club been collecting recycled eyeglasses in your community?

 

Lions Humor